fbpx
Categories
News

COVID-19 more likely to affect marginalized communities in Canada

Last week, Innovative Research Group published the results of a recent study they conducted into how COVID-19 has affected marginalized populations in Canada.

Last week, Innovative Research Group published the results of a recent study they conducted into how COVID-19 has affected marginalized populations in Canada.

In partnership with Egale and the African-Canadian Civic Engagement Council, the survey collected the response of 2,322 people living in Canada.

Here are some of the findings from the study.

2SLGBTQ+ respondents were also more likely (29%) to indicate that they were Black, Indigenous, or a person of colour (BIPOC) than the general population (20%).

Employment

Respondents who belonged to the 2SLGBTQ+ community (referred to as LGBTQI2S in the report) were more likely to be unemployed than the general population, as well as more likely to be a student, more likely to be working part-time (if working), and more likely to have been laid off because of COVID-19.

When they are working, 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely than the general population to be doing so in the following sectors:

  • Health care
  • Retail
  • Education
  • Government and public administration
  • Hospitality and tourism
  • Arts and entertainment
  • Not-for-profit
  • Consumer packaged goods

2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely (55% and 58%) than the general public (49%) to work in an environment where they must interact with other face-to-face often or even all the time.

Both 2SLGBTQ+ groups were more likely to have been laid off or had their work hours reduced than those of the general population

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Laid off13%19%21%
Reduced hours12%13%9%
Combined25%32%30%

They’re also more likely to commute to work using forms of transportation that require public interaction.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Own vehicle75%60%50%
Public transit12%18%23%
Walking/cycling8%11%4%
Carpooling5%9%24%

Plus, they typically feel less safe (18% and 23%) than the general population (12%) during that commute.

Health

Respondents from the 2SLGBTQ+ community were more likely to have general health challenges than the general population, and this was even more pronounced if they were also part of the BIPOC community.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Physical disability14%20%36%
Mental disability10%25%35%
Respiratory issues21%28%40%

Both BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ and non-BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ respondents responded with poorer physical health and mental health, as well as higher stress levels than the general population did:

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Fair/poor physical health17%33%39%
Fair/poor mental health21%41%38%
High stress levels24%37%41%

According to the poll results, both 2SLGBTQ+ groups seemed slightly less confident (17% and 18%) in being able to access necessary health care than the general population (11%).

They’re also less likely (14% and 17%) than the general population (9%) to be satisfied with their lives at the moment.

COVID-19

BIPOC 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely (21%) than the other two groups (both 9%) to have been admitted to the hospital for a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19.

Finally, 2SLGBTQ+ respondents were more likely than the general population to report COVID-19 significantly impacting their physical health, mental health, finances, and quality of life, more so if they were Black, Indigenous, or persons of colour.

General2SLGBTQ+BIPOC
2SLGBTQ+
Physical health17%25%33%
Mental health25%47%47%
Household finances25%27%32%
Quality of life29%37%42%

Support independent journalism

By Kim Siever

Kim Siever is an independent journalist based in Lethbridge, Alberta. He writes daily news stories, focusing on politics and labour.

Comment on this story

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: